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Spring 2013
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CT Imaging

Smile, great white, and tell us your story

A team of researchers at Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) is studying living great whites and other sharks -- as well as fossilized teeth -- to gain insight into sharks today as well as their ancient ancestors. The study of shark teeth has been dormant for decades, but the scientists are renewing it using the latest computer-aided imaging technology. Here, graduate student Josh Moyer, who works with ecology and evolutionary biology professor Willy Bemis, explains how detailed high-resolution, three-dimensional models of shark tooth anatomy tell a story of development and evolution.

 

Zamia ovulate cone

A 3D rendering of an extant (still living) zamia ovulate cone, imaged using Micro CT technology at the Cornell Imaging Facility as part of research by William Crepet, professor and chair of the Department of Plant Biology, Crepet studies many paleobotanical holdings at the L.H. Bailey Hortorium of Cornell University.

 

Fossilized flower

A 3D rendering of a Raritaniflora tomentosa flower, imaged using Micro CT technology at the Cornell Imaging Facility as part of research by William Crepet, professor and chair of the Department of Plant Biology, Crepet studies many paleobotanical holdings at the L.H. Bailey Hortorium of Cornell University.

 


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